The Operating Model That Is Eating The World

Strategy Talk

Today’s fastest growing, most profoundly impactful companies are using a completely different operating model.

These companies are lean, mean, learning machines. They have an intense bias to action and a tolerance for risk, expressed through frequent experimentation and relentless product iteration. They hack together products and services, test them, and improve them, while their legacy competition edits PowerPoint. They are obsessed with company culture and top tier talent, with an emphasis on employees that can imagine, build, and test their own ideas. They are maniacally focused on customers. They are hypersensitive to friction – in their daily operations and their user experience. They are open, connected, and build with and for their community of users and co-conspirators. They are comfortable with the unknown – business models and customer value are revealed over time. They are driven by a purpose greater than profit; each has its own aspirational “dent in the universe.” We may simply refer to them as the first generation of truly responsive organizations.
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To win in the marketplace, someone has to create and deliver exceptional products, services, and experiences, and planning won’t get us there. the emphasis on People is all about making. “Makers” are people who have skills (as opposed to credentials). They think by doing: experimenting, testing, and learning. Within these high performance cultures management has evolved into something more akin to mentorship. The thinking goes, if workers are capable of making decisions about their priorities and workflow, what’s left for the manager is skills development, knowledge sharing, and helping with roadblocks – the Montessori method gone corporate.

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A Revolution of Meaning – Tom Kniesmeijer

Strategy Talk, The Video Section

I finally got round to watch the TedX presentation by my former Re:Set colleague Tom Kniesmeijer. I love it. It adresses the issues in our society (Zeitgeist) and what you as an individual can do with it. As he puts it: We’re doing too much. Stand still, take a look inside and train your meaning muscle. Tom Kniesmeijer introduces the revolution of meaning. And this revolution needs you!
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APG Noisy Thinking

Strategy Talk

This presentation by Thomas Griffiths, Planner at DigitasLBi is great for all brand strategists. I particularly like the idea and heart of his talk that brands should give the control back to the people in the conversations we have with them. He describes the development of tight, closed communities. the brand becomes shattered in these diverse groups and that’s okay. Let the consumer work it out for themselves.