The Operating Model That Is Eating The World

Strategy Talk

Today’s fastest growing, most profoundly impactful companies are using a completely different operating model.

These companies are lean, mean, learning machines. They have an intense bias to action and a tolerance for risk, expressed through frequent experimentation and relentless product iteration. They hack together products and services, test them, and improve them, while their legacy competition edits PowerPoint. They are obsessed with company culture and top tier talent, with an emphasis on employees that can imagine, build, and test their own ideas. They are maniacally focused on customers. They are hypersensitive to friction – in their daily operations and their user experience. They are open, connected, and build with and for their community of users and co-conspirators. They are comfortable with the unknown – business models and customer value are revealed over time. They are driven by a purpose greater than profit; each has its own aspirational “dent in the universe.” We may simply refer to them as the first generation of truly responsive organizations.
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To win in the marketplace, someone has to create and deliver exceptional products, services, and experiences, and planning won’t get us there. the emphasis on People is all about making. “Makers” are people who have skills (as opposed to credentials). They think by doing: experimenting, testing, and learning. Within these high performance cultures management has evolved into something more akin to mentorship. The thinking goes, if workers are capable of making decisions about their priorities and workflow, what’s left for the manager is skills development, knowledge sharing, and helping with roadblocks – the Montessori method gone corporate.

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Botanical manufacturing

Design & Architecture

Growing_chairs_Paula_Buit

Growing solid wooden furniture without the joins

This is intruiging. Gavin Munro of Derbyshire-based Full Grown explains how moulding trees into one-piece chairs, lamps or mirror frames is far more eco-friendly than felling. This is no ordinary furniture showroom. In a field on the side of a hill 15 miles north of Derby lie row after row of perfectly maintained willow, oak, ash and sycamore trees. What clearly mark this field out from a regular forest are the blue-and-black plastic moulds that are training the trees in pre-defined routes, where they are gently and expertly manipulated into the exact shape of a chair, a table, a lamp or a mirror frame. read more

Business Innovation by Design

Strategy Talk

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Business Innovation Design, Jeffrey Tjendra

Each of the disciplines – brand, design thinking, innovation management etc.- have overlapping approaches. What if you merge different disciplines into a unified multidisciplinary approach? See here his multidisciplinary approach that guides businesses on what and how to innovate and grow. I truly like the thought of breaking through the existing silo’s and merging visions and disciplines. A good attempt to find a new approach where you have an overview of how elements are linked to each other and get the whole picture.

Teaching to see – Design Thinking film

Strategy Talk

Inge Druckrey: Teaching to See

A crash course in design thinking! This film is about learning to look and visualize in order to design, about the importance of drawing. It is one designer’s personal experience of issues that face all designers, expressed with sympathy and encouragement, and illustrated with examples of Inge [Druckrey]’s own work and that of her students.

Positioning

Strategy Talk


A new interesting presentation by Helge Tenno on positioning.

Get out of your comfort zone, culturally

Strategy Talk
  • “Get out of your comfort zone, culturally. . .”
  • “Be a great listener, understand and be empathetic to the truth – who they are, their soul – and make this relevant to greater number of people
  • “The longer you work the more people want to put you in a silo, so they can define who you are by their terms. Never let anyone define you by their terms”.

By John Jay, Wieden+Kennedy, on creativity

Technology, Aestetics & Behavior: universal design concepts

Strategy Talk

Moving into the area of communication between people and objects there are a range of concepts and challenges never seen or met before online. Three universal concepts have stood out as important to understand better in order to design better: Technology itself, which we by misunderstanding also overcomplicate. Aesthetics – the motivational force of human emotion, and copying behavior – not reality. By Helge Tenno